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280 days of Urbpandemonium #154

 photo IMGP2386_zpsxxclpuer.jpg
Some people don't like parasites, but what if the parasite is large and colorful and delicious? Many people seem to love Laetiporus sulphureus*, especially foragers who may scan forests looking for their beloved "chickens," perched high on an oak tree. The oak tree, if it could express a preference, probably would rather not have this fungus in its heartwood, breaking down hemicellulose and cellulose and digesting the results. By the time the mushrooms have appeared, the fungus has been in the wood for years. The fungus continues to feed even if the tree falls down and dies.

This species has the distinction of holding the record for most massive single mushroom--actually a fused collection of shelves--more than a hundred pounds. The forager who found it managed to cut some 70 pounds down to bring home.
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* Laetiporus means with bright pores and sulphureus means the colour of sulphur.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
shellynoir
Aug. 26th, 2015 03:14 am (UTC)
ahhh....single mushroom is not the same as single fungus?

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141114-the-biggest-organism-in-the-world
urbpan
Aug. 26th, 2015 05:07 am (UTC)
Correct, the fungus that produced the single largest mushroom was confined to one tree. The parasite in your link extends across an entire forest. It doubtlessly produces many mushrooms most years (although my own colony hasn't produced lately: http://urbpan.livejournal.com/1402415.html)
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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